PUBLIC OPINION > Obama Doesn’t Deserve ‘Person of the Year’

TIME named its 2012 Person of the Year this month and, as expected, the President took the title. Why is that expected? Well, mostly because every president since FDR has received the title (with the exception of Gerald Ford). Plus, this is Obama’s second time receiving the title. But again, that’s usually how it goes — George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, Ronald Reagan, most of the guys who served multiple terms also received multiple titles. But we wanted to know if the public thinks Obama deserves it.

We should probably mention that “Person of the Year” does not necessarily mean “best” person of the year, but rather “most influential.” One commenter noted, “Remember some other TMPOTY winners? Well Hitler, Stalin, and Arafat are a few other winners.” However, based on the comments, it seems most people are simply unimpressed with TIME’s method of selection. It’s a strange selection process, and the fact that every president gets it kind of detracts from the meaning anyway.
PUBLIC OPINION > Obama Doesn’t Deserve ‘Person of the Year’
TIME named its 2012 Person of the Year this month and, as expected, the President took the title. Why is that expected? Well, mostly because every president since FDR has received the title (with the exception of Gerald Ford). Plus, this is Obama’s second time receiving the title. But again, that’s usually how it goes — George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, Ronald Reagan, most of the guys who served multiple terms also received multiple titles. But we wanted to know if the public thinks Obama deserves it.
We should probably mention that “Person of the Year” does not necessarily mean “best” person of the year, but rather “most influential.” One commenter noted, “Remember some other TMPOTY winners? Well Hitler, Stalin, and Arafat are a few other winners.” However, based on the comments, it seems most people are simply unimpressed with TIME’s method of selection. It’s a strange selection process, and the fact that every president gets it kind of detracts from the meaning anyway.
PUBLIC OPINION > Romney Shouldn’t Have a Role in Obama’s Second Term
Now that the cards have fallen, former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney is free to pursue another spot on the political field. According to Obama, Romney might have a chance to "work together" with the President, and the two are reportedly meeting Thursday for lunch to talk about it. But should Romney even get involved? The L.A. Times was curious to see whether or not the public wants Romney to work with Obama. Here’s how the public voted.
Not many people actually want to see Romney get involved with the Obama administration. However, there was no one big reason why people voted one way or the other. Respondents had a variety of opinions, from “Obama needs all the help he can get” to “Romney could get Obama his tea,” and from “let Obama fend for himself” to “Romney lost for a reason.” The only constant seemed to be negativity. Tensions were high during the election, so perhaps it shouldn’t come as a surprise.

PUBLIC OPINION > Romney Shouldn’t Have a Role in Obama’s Second Term

Now that the cards have fallen, former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney is free to pursue another spot on the political field. According to Obama, Romney might have a chance to "work together" with the President, and the two are reportedly meeting Thursday for lunch to talk about it. But should Romney even get involved? The L.A. Times was curious to see whether or not the public wants Romney to work with Obama. Here’s how the public voted.


Not many people actually want to see Romney get involved with the Obama administration. However, there was no one big reason why people voted one way or the other. Respondents had a variety of opinions, from “Obama needs all the help he can get” to “Romney could get Obama his tea,” and from “let Obama fend for himself” to “Romney lost for a reason.” The only constant seemed to be negativity. Tensions were high during the election, so perhaps it shouldn’t come as a surprise.

PUBLIC OPINION > Compromise Between Political Parties Probably Won’t Happen
The election is finally over. Whichever side you fall on, the cards are on the table — at least until the next Senate elections. At the moment, there are about 60.8 million satisfied voters and 57.9 million frustrated ones, but the L.A. Times wanted to know if both sides could ever learn to compromise. Here’s how the public responded.
Unfortunately, it looks like most people think compromise is not an option. It was a heated election this time around, so we’re hardly surprised. It may take a little while for some heads to cool. But let’s take a look at the demographics to find out where the heat is coming from.

PUBLIC OPINION > Compromise Between Political Parties Probably Won’t Happen

The election is finally over. Whichever side you fall on, the cards are on the table — at least until the next Senate elections. At the moment, there are about 60.8 million satisfied voters and 57.9 million frustrated ones, but the L.A. Times wanted to know if both sides could ever learn to compromise. Here’s how the public responded.


Unfortunately, it looks like most people think compromise is not an option. It was a heated election this time around, so we’re hardly surprised. It may take a little while for some heads to cool. But let’s take a look at the demographics to find out where the heat is coming from.

PUBLIC OPINION > SodaHeads Predict Mitt Romney Will Be the Next President
In case you failed to notice, it’s election day! All that campaigning and debating and politicking has lead up to this 11-hour window. Absentee voters have already done their duty, but if you’re walking in, this is your day. Naturally, we asked the public for their poll day predictions, and here they are.
Based on more than 1,500 registered votes (unregistered votes were filtered out to ensure legitimacy), SodaHeads feel Mitt Romney is more likely to come out on top after all the votes are tallied up. As usual, the results were pretty close — 47% for Obama and 53% for Romney — but as you know, an election can be decided by the smallest percentile. If Romney can pull the same numbers at the polls, it will be more than enough.

PUBLIC OPINION > SodaHeads Predict Mitt Romney Will Be the Next President

In case you failed to notice, it’s election day! All that campaigning and debating and politicking has lead up to this 11-hour window. Absentee voters have already done their duty, but if you’re walking in, this is your day. Naturally, we asked the public for their poll day predictions, and here they are.

Based on more than 1,500 registered votes (unregistered votes were filtered out to ensure legitimacy), SodaHeads feel Mitt Romney is more likely to come out on top after all the votes are tallied up. As usual, the results were pretty close — 47% for Obama and 53% for Romney — but as you know, an election can be decided by the smallest percentile. If Romney can pull the same numbers at the polls, it will be more than enough.

PUBLIC OPINION > Europeans Would Vote for Obama
Say what you will about the presidential candidates, but public polls are cutting the 2012 presidential election as very close. So what if this election was being held in Europe? You don’t have to take sides to speculate how other countries would vote. So we asked who the public thinks Europeans would vote for.
Political landscapes are always changing, but most respondents feel Europeans would go for Obama. Of course, some respondents noted that it’s hard to lump together countries as diverse as Germany, Poland, Greece, Russia, and Sweden; but it’s also hard to lump together fifty diverse states. Still, let’s break it down a bit.

PUBLIC OPINION > Europeans Would Vote for Obama

Say what you will about the presidential candidates, but public polls are cutting the 2012 presidential election as very close. So what if this election was being held in Europe? You don’t have to take sides to speculate how other countries would vote. So we asked who the public thinks Europeans would vote for.

Political landscapes are always changing, but most respondents feel Europeans would go for Obama. Of course, some respondents noted that it’s hard to lump together countries as diverse as Germany, Poland, Greece, Russia, and Sweden; but it’s also hard to lump together fifty diverse states. Still, let’s break it down a bit.

PUBLIC OPINION > Most People Have Crossed Party Lines to Vote
As we’ve seen in previous recaps, people who call themselves liberals or conservatives are not very likely to vote against their party this year. But Colin Powell, a self-proclaimed moderate Republican who served as Secretary of State under George W. Bush, is backing Democratic candidate Barack Obama once again. We wanted to know how much of the public is willing to cross party lines to vote as well.
More than two-thirds of respondents said they’ve voted “against” their party at least once. Unfortunately, not many people gave specifics, but the ones that did surprised us. There were Republicans who said they were voting for Obama, and Democrats who said they had voted for Reagan. Some also counted smaller, local offices. It’s nice to get a whiff of flexibility in the midst of an election season.

PUBLIC OPINION > Most People Have Crossed Party Lines to Vote

As we’ve seen in previous recaps, people who call themselves liberals or conservatives are not very likely to vote against their party this year. But Colin Powell, a self-proclaimed moderate Republican who served as Secretary of State under George W. Bush, is backing Democratic candidate Barack Obama once again. We wanted to know how much of the public is willing to cross party lines to vote as well.

More than two-thirds of respondents said they’ve voted “against” their party at least once. Unfortunately, not many people gave specifics, but the ones that did surprised us. There were Republicans who said they were voting for Obama, and Democrats who said they had voted for Reagan. Some also counted smaller, local offices. It’s nice to get a whiff of flexibility in the midst of an election season.

PUBLIC OPINION > The Presidential Debates Didn’t Change Much
A lot was made of this year’s presidential debates. They set Twitter records, TV viewership records, and even spawned a couple of memes. But we want to know if the debates actually helped people pick the right candidate, or if it just served as a way for the public to reaffirm what they already thought.
For all the hype that surrounded the debates, they don’t seem to have had much of an impact. Only 17% of the nearly 1,500 people who voted said the debates helped them pick a candidate. The rest said they already knew who they were picking (76%) or they didn’t get the information they needed (7%). But there was still a noticeable difference in how some demographics voted.

PUBLIC OPINION > The Presidential Debates Didn’t Change Much

A lot was made of this year’s presidential debates. They set Twitter records, TV viewership records, and even spawned a couple of memes. But we want to know if the debates actually helped people pick the right candidate, or if it just served as a way for the public to reaffirm what they already thought.

For all the hype that surrounded the debates, they don’t seem to have had much of an impact. Only 17% of the nearly 1,500 people who voted said the debates helped them pick a candidate. The rest said they already knew who they were picking (76%) or they didn’t get the information they needed (7%). But there was still a noticeable difference in how some demographics voted.

PUBLIC OPINION > Moderates More Impressed by Obama in Last Round of Debates
The last of the three presidential debates for 2012 took place Monday evening, so if you’re banking on the debates to make your mind up, you have all the material you’re going to get. This week’s debate focused on foreign policy — Afghanistan, Libya, China, Israel, Syria, and of course the role and scale of the military. We asked the public who put their best foot forward this time around.
Romney ultimately took the poll again (by two percent), but this time it was neck-and-neck the whole way through. That’s probably because the candidates had similar stances on most of the issues. The two topics that created the most tension were the Obama administration’s handling of foreign affairs in the past, and the amount of money that should be spent on the military. The rest of the debate was nuanced at best.

PUBLIC OPINION > Moderates More Impressed by Obama in Last Round of Debates

The last of the three presidential debates for 2012 took place Monday evening, so if you’re banking on the debates to make your mind up, you have all the material you’re going to get. This week’s debate focused on foreign policy — Afghanistan, Libya, China, Israel, Syria, and of course the role and scale of the military. We asked the public who put their best foot forward this time around.

Romney ultimately took the poll again (by two percent), but this time it was neck-and-neck the whole way through. That’s probably because the candidates had similar stances on most of the issues. The two topics that created the most tension were the Obama administration’s handling of foreign affairs in the past, and the amount of money that should be spent on the military. The rest of the debate was nuanced at best.

It’s the last debate of the election… so let’s make it count! Click on the link to watch the debate live at 6PM PST / 9 PM EST — and use SodaHead’s custom Debate Tracker to showcase your opinion in real-time! http://bit.ly/TCYP2Y

It’s the last debate of the election… so let’s make it count! Click on the link to watch the debate live at 6PM PST / 9 PM EST — and use SodaHead’s custom Debate Tracker to showcase your opinion in real-time! http://bit.ly/TCYP2Y

PUBLIC OPINION > SodaHeads Say Mitt Romney Won the Second Presidential Debate
The first round of the presidential debate went to Mitt Romney with few questions asked, but the second round was a closer call. The President seemed better prepared, even aggressive, compared to his lackluster performance in Denver. But was it enough to win the debate? We asked SodaHeads.
Obama’s improved performance was not enough to convince the majority of SodaHeads that he was the better debater. For the most part, respondents were referring to content over performance. Regardless of how confident or aggressive the candidates were during the debate, most people were only concerned with their policies and promises.

PUBLIC OPINION > SodaHeads Say Mitt Romney Won the Second Presidential Debate

The first round of the presidential debate went to Mitt Romney with few questions asked, but the second round was a closer call. The President seemed better prepared, even aggressive, compared to his lackluster performance in Denver. But was it enough to win the debate? We asked SodaHeads.

Obama’s improved performance was not enough to convince the majority of SodaHeads that he was the better debater. For the most part, respondents were referring to content over performance. Regardless of how confident or aggressive the candidates were during the debate, most people were only concerned with their policies and promises.